Example LINUX init Script

From time to time, people want me to create LINUX init scripts for them. I usually just take an existing one for another service and change it up to work for my new application, but most of them have become so long these days that I end up having to hack out a ton of code just to reduce them down to the very basic script I need. I decided to create this very simple template so I wouldn’t have to keep trimming down the more complex scripts that one tends to find in /etc/init.d these days.

This script is chkconfig compatible, so call it the name of your new service and put it in /etc/init.d

The chkconfig: 235 section indicates the the default runlevels. For instance, if we called this script /etc/init.d/new-service and ran chkconfig new-service on, it would be active in runlevels 2,3 and 5.

The 98 and 55 numbers indicate the order of startup and kill. This means that using this tag, the startup symbolic link would be named S98new-service and the symbolic link to kill the process would be named K55new-service.

#### SNIP ####

#! /bin/sh
# Basic support for IRIX style chkconfig
###
# chkconfig: 235 98 55
# description: Manages the services you are controlling with the chkconfig command
###

case "$1" in
  start)
        echo -n "Starting new-service"
        #To run it as root:
        /path/to/command/to/start/new-service
        #Or to run it as some other user:
        /bin/su - username -c /path/to/command/to/start/new-service
        echo "."
        ;;
  stop)
        echo -n "Stopping new-service"
        #To run it as root:
        /path/to/command/to/stop/new-service
        #Or to run it as some other user:
        /bin/su - username -c /path/to/command/to/stop/new-service
        echo "."
        ;;

  *)
        echo "Usage: /sbin/service new-service {start|stop}"
        exit 1
esac

exit 0


#### /SNIP ####

Obviously change all instances of “new-service” to the name of your actual service… Enjoy!

3 thoughts on “Example LINUX init Script

  1. Pingback: Example LINUX init Script – unix | Bloger Net

  2. One issue I have with the sample template you’ve provided is that unless you have a very good reason not to (as per the RedHat sysvinitfiles documentation), the end priority should always be equal to 100 – start priority. So if your start priority is 20, then your end priority should be 80.

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