MIT Guide to Lock Picking – Appendix B

Contrary to widespread myth, it is not a felony to possess lockpicks. Each state has its own laws with respect to such burglarious instruments. Here is the Massacusetts version quoted in entirety from the massachusetts general code:

Chapter 266 (crimes against property)
Section 49. Burglarious instruments; making; possession; use.

Whoever makes or mends, or begins to make or mend, or
knowingly has in his possession, an engine, machine, tool or
implement adapted and designed for cutting through, forcing or
breaking open a building, room, vault, safe or other depository,
IN ORDER TO STEAL THEREFROM money or other property, or to commit
any other crime, knowing the same to be adapted and designed for
the purpose aforesaid, WITH INTENT TO USE OR EMPLOY OR ALLOW the
same to be used or employed for such purpose, or whoever
knowingly has in his possession a master key designed to fit more
than one motor vehicle, WITH INTENT, TO USE OR EMPLOY THE SAME to
steal a motor vehicle or other property therefrom, shall be
punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than
ten years or by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars and
imprisonment in jail for not more than two and one half years.

Emphasis added.

In other words, mere possession means nothing. If they stop you for speeding or something, and find a pick set, they can’t do much. On the other hand, if they catch you picking the lock on a Money machine they get to draw and quarter you.

States with similar wording include ME, NH, NY. One place that DOES NOT have similar wording, and does make possession illegal, is Washington, DC. These are the only other places I have checked. I would imagine that most states are similar to Massachusetts, but I would not bet anything substantial (say, more than a slice of pizza) on it.

It may be a good idea to carry around a xeroxed copy of the appropriate page from your state’s criminal code.

Back to Index >
Appendix A >

MIT Guide to Lock Picking – Chapter 10

Lock picking is a craft, not a science. This document presents the knowledge and skills that are essential to lock picking, but more importantly it provides you with models and exercises that will help you study locks on your own. To excel at lock picking, You must practice and develop a style which fits you personally. Remember that the best technique is the one that works best for you.

Back to Index >
Chapter 9 >
Appendix A >

MIT Guide to Lock Picking – Chapter 9

Real locks have a wide range of mechanical features and defects that help and hinder lock picking. If a lock doesn’t respond to scrubbing, then it probably has one of the traits discussed in this chapter. To open the lock, you must diagnose the trait and apply the recommended technique. The exercises will help you develop the mechanical sensitivity and dexterity necessary to recognize and exploit the different traits.

9.1 Which Way To Turn

It can be very frustrating to spend a long time picking a lock and then discover that you turned the plug the wrong way. If you turn a plug the wrong way it will rotate freelyun til it hits a stop, or until it rotates 180 degrees and the drivers enter the keyway (see section 9.11). Section 9.11 also explains how to turn the plug more than 180 degrees if that is necessary to fully retract the bolt. When the plug is turned in the correct direction, you should feel an extra resistance when the plug cam engages the bolt spring.

The direction to turn the plug depends on the bolt mechanism, not on the lock, but here are some general rules. Cheap padlocks will open if the plug is turned in either direction, so you can chose the directionh which is best for the torque wrench. All padlocks made by the Master company can be opened in either direction. Padlocks made by Yale will only open if the plug is turned clockwise. The double plug Yale cylinder locks generally open by turning the bottom of the keyway (i.e., the flat edge of the key) away from the nearest doorframe. Single plug cylinder locks also follow this rule. See Figure 9.1. Locks built in to the doorknob usually open clockwise. Desk and filing cabinet locks also tend to ope clockwise.

When you encounter a new kind of lock mechanism, try turning the plug in both directions. In the correct direction, the plug will be stopped by the pins, so the stop will feel mushy when you use heavy torque. In the wrong direction the plug will be stopped by a metal tab, so the stop will feel solid.


Figure 9.1:Direction to turn plug

Figure 9.1:Direction to turn plug

9.2 How Far to Turn

The companion question to which way to turn a lock is how far to turn it. Desk and filing cabinet locks generally open with less than a quarter turn (90 degrees) of the plug. When opening a desk lock try to avoid having the plug lock in the open position. Locks built into doorknobs also tend to open with less than a quarter turn. Locks which are separate from the doorknob tend to require a half turn t open. Deadbolt lock mechanisms can require almost a full turn to open.

Turning a lock more than 180 degrees is difficult because the drivers enter the bottom of the keyway. See section 9.11.

9.3 Gravity

Picking a lock that has the springs at the top is different than picking one with the springs at the bottom. It should be obvious how to tell the two apart. The nice feature of a lock with the springs at the bottom is that gravity holds the key pins down once they set. With the set pins out of the way, it is easy to find and manipulate the remaining unset pins. It is also straight forward to test for the slight give of a correctly set pin. When the springs are on top, gravity will pull the key pins down after the driver pin catches at the sheer line. In this case, you can identify the set pins by noticing that the key pin is easy to lift and that it does not feel springy. Set pins also rattle as you draw the pick over them because they are not being pushed down by the driver pin.

9.4 Pins Not Setting

If you scrub a lock and pins are not setting even when you vary the torque, then some pin has false set and it is keeping the rest of the pins from setting. Consider a lock whose pins prefer to set from back to front. If the backmost pin false sets high or low (see Figure 9.2), then the plug cannot rotate enough to allow the other pins to bind. It is hard to recognize that a back pin has false set because the springiness of the front pins makes it hard to sense the small give of a correctly set back pin. The main symptom of this situation is that the other pins will not set unless a very large torque is applied.

When you encounter this situation, release the torque and start over by concentrating on the back pins. Try a light torque and moderate pressure, or heavy torque and heavy pressure. Try to feel for the click that happens when a pin reaches the sheer line and the plug rotates slightly. The click will be easier to feel if you use a stiff torque wrench.

9.5 Elastic Deformation

The interesting events of lock picking happen over distances measured in thousandths of an inch. Over such short distances, metals behave like springs. Very little force is necessary to deflect a piece of metal over those distances, and when the force is removed, the metal will spring back to its original position.

Deformation can be used to your advantage if you want to force several pins to bind at once. For example, picking a lock with pins that prefer to set from front to back is slow because the pinsset one at a time. This is particularly true if you only apply pressure as the pick is drawn out of the lock. Each pass of the pick will only set the frontmost pin that is binding. Numerous passes are required to set all the pins. If the preference for setting is not very strong (i.e., the axis of the plug holes is only slightly skewed from the plug’s center line), then you can cause additional pins to bind by applying extra torque. Basically, the torque puts a twist in the plug that causes the front of the plug to be deflected further than the back of the plug. With light torque, the back of the plug stays in its initial position, but with medium to heavy torque, the front pin columns bend enough to allow the back of the plug to rotate and thus cause the back pins to bind. With the extra torque, a single stroke of the pick can set several pins, and the lock can be opened quickly. Too much torque causes its own problems.

When the torque is large, the front pins and plug holes can be deformed enough to prevent the pins from setting correctly. In particular, the first pin tends to false set low. Figure 9.2 shows how excess torque can deform the bottom of the driver pin and prevent the key pin from reaching the sheer line. This situation can be recognized by the lack of give in the first pin. Correctly set pins feel springy if they are pressed down slightly. A falsely set pin lacks this springiness. The solution is to press down hard on the firstpin. You may want to reduce the torque slightly, but if you reduce torque too much then other pins will unset as the first pin is being depressed.

It is also possible to deform the top of the key pin. The key pin is scissored between the plug and the hull and stays fixed. When this happens, the pin is said to be false set high.

9.6 Loose Plug

The plug is held into the hull by being wider at the front and by having a cam on the back that is bigger than the hole drilled into the hull. If the cam is not properly installed, the plug can move in and out of the lock slightly. On the outward stroke of the pick, the plug will move forward, and if you apply pressure on the inward stroke, the plug will be pushed back.

The problem with a loose plug is that the driver pins tend to set on the back of the plug holes rather than on the sides of the holes. When you push the plug in, the drivers will unset. You can use this defect to your advantage by only applying pressure on the outward or inward strokw of the pick. Alternatively, you can use your finger or torque wrench to prevent the plug from moving forward.


Figure 9.2: Driver pin false set by elastic deformation

Figure 9.2: Driver pin false set by elastic deformation

9.7 Pin Diameter

When the pair of pins in a particular column have different diameters, that column will react strangely to the pressure of the pick.

The top half of Figure 9.3 shows a pin column with a driver pin that has a larger diameter than the key pin. As the pins are lifted, the picking pressure is resisted by the binding friction and the spring force. Once the driver clears the sheer line, the plug rotates (until some other pin binds) and the only resistance to motion is the spring force. If the key pin is small enough and the plug did not rotate very far, the key pin can enter the hull without colliding with the edge of the hull. Some other pin is binding, so again the only resistance to motion is the spring force. This relationship is graphed in the bottom half of the Figure. Basically, the pins feel normal at first, but then the lock clicks and the pin becomes springy. The narrow key pin can be pushed all the way into the hull without loosing its springiness, but when the picking pressure is released, the key pin will fall back to its initial position while the large driver catches on the edge of the plug hole.

The problem with a large driver pin is that the key pin tends to get stuck in the hull when some other pin sets. Imagine that a neighboring pin sets and the plug rotates enough to bind the narrow key pin. If the pick was pressing down on the narrow key pin at the same time as it was pressing down on the pin that set, then the narrow key pin will be in the hull and it will get stuck there when the plug rotates.

The behavior of a large key pin is left as an exercise for the reader.

9.8 Beveled Holes and Rounded pins

Some lock manufacturers (e.g., Yale) bevel the edges of the plug holes and/or round off the ends of the key pins. This tends to reduce the wear on the lock and it can both help and hinder lock picking. You can recognize a lock with these features by the large give in set pins. See Figure 9.4. That is, the distance between the height at which the driver pin catches on the edge of the plug hole and the height at which the key pin hits the hull is larger (sometimes as large as a sixteenth of an inch) when the plug holes are beveled or the pins are rounded. While the key pin is moving between those two heights, the only resistance to motion will be the force of the spring. There won’t be any binding friction. This corresponds to the dip in the force graph shown in Figure 5.5.

A lock with beveled plug holes requires more scrubbing to open than a lock without beveled holes because the driver pins set on the bevel instead of setting on the top of the plug. The plug will not turn if one of the drivers is caught on a bevel. The key pin must be scrubbed again to push the driver pin up and off the bevel. The left driver pi in Figure 9.6a is set. The driver is resting on the bevel, and the bottom plate has moved enough to allow the right driver to bind. Figure 9.6b shows what happens after the right driver pin sets. The bottom plate slides further to the right and noe the left driver pin is scissored between the bevel and the top plate. It is caught on the bevel. To open the lock, the left driver pin must be pushed up above the bevel. Once that driver is free, the bottom plate can slide and the righ driver may bind on its bevel.

If you encounter a lock with beveled plug holes, and all the pins appear to be set but the lock is not opening, you should reduce torque and continue scrubbing over the pins. The reduced torque will make it easier to push the drivers off the bevels. If pins unset when you reduce the torque, try increasing the torque and the picking pressure. The problem with increasing the force is that you may jam some key pins into the hull.


Figure 9.3: Driver pin wider than key pin

Figure 9.3: Driver pin wider than key pin


Figure 9.4: Beveled plug holes and rounded key pins

Figure 9.4: Beveled plug holes and rounded key pins

9.9 Mushroom Driver Pins

A general trick that lock makers use to make picking harder is to modify the shape of the driver pin. The most popular shapes are mushroom, spool and serrated, see Figure 9.7. The purpose of these shapes is to cause the pins to false set low. These drivers stop a picking technique called vibration picking (see section 9.12), but they only slightly complicate scrubbing and one-pin-at-a-time picking (see chapter 4).


Figure 9.5: (a) Driver sets on bevel

Figure 9.5: (a) Driver sets on bevel


Figure 9.6: (a) Driver jams on bevel

Figure 9.6: (a) Driver jams on bevel

If you pick a lock and the plug stops turning after a few degrees and none of the pins can be pushed up and further, then you known that the lock has modified drivers. Basically, the lip of the driver has caught at the sheer line. See the bottom of Figure 9.7. Mushroom and spool drivers are often found in Russwin locks, and locks that have several spacers for master keying.

You can identify the positions with mushroom drivers by applying a light torque and pushing up on each pin. The pins with mushroom drivers will exhibit a tendency to bring the plug back to the fully locked position. By pushing the key pin up you are pushing the flat top of the key pin against the tilted bottom of the mushroom driver. This causes thedriv er tostraigh ten up which in turn causes the plug to unrotate. You can use this motion to identify the columns that have mushroom drivers. Push those pins up to sheer line; even if you lose some of the other pins in the process they will be easier to re-pick than the pins with mushroom drivers. Eventually all the pins will be correctly set at the sheer line.

One way to identify all the positions with mushroom drivers is to use the flat of your pick to push all the pins up about halfway. This should put most of the drivers in their cockable position and you can feel for them.

To pick a lock with modified drivers, use a lighter torque and heavier pressure. You want to error on the side of pushing the key pins too far into the hull. In fact, another way to pick these locks is to use the flat side of your pick to push the pins up all the way, and apply very heavy torque to hold them there. Use a scrubbing action to vibrate the key pins while you slowly reduce the torque. Reducing the torque reduces the binding friction on the pins. The vibration and spring force cause the key pins to slide down to the sheer line.

The key to picking locks with modified drivers is recognizing incorrectly set pins. Mushroom driver set on its lip will not have the springy give of a correctly set driver. Practice recognizing the difference.

9.10 Master Keys

Many applications require keys that open only a single lock and keys that open a group of locks. The keys that open a single lock are called change keys and the keys that open multiple locks are called master keys. To allow both the change key and the master key to open the same lock, a locksmith adds an extra pin called a spacer to some of the pin columns. See Figure 9.8. The effect of the spacer is to create two gaps in the pin column that could be lined up with the sheer line. Usually the change key aligns the top of the spacer with the sheer line, and the master key aligns the bottom of the spacer with the sheer line (the idea is to prevent people from filing down a change key to get a master key). In either case the plug is free to rotate.

In general, spacers make a lock easier to pick. They increase the number of opportunities to set each pin, and they make it more likely that the lock can opened by setting the all the pins at about the same height. In most cases only two or three positions will have spacers. You can recognize a position with a spacer by the two clicks you feel when the pin is pushed down. If the spacer has a smaller diameter than the driver and key pins, then you will feel a wide springy region because the spacer will not bind as it passes through the sheer line. It is more common for the spacer to be larger than the driver pin. You can recognize this by an increase in friction when the spacer passes through the sheer line. Since the spacer is larger than the driver pin, it will also catch better on the plug. If you push the spacer further into the hull, you will feel a strong click when the bottom of the spacer clears the sheer line.

Thin spacers can cause serious problems. If you apply heavy torque and the plug has beveled holes, the spacer can twist and jam at the sheer line. It is also possible for the spacer to fall into the keyway if the plug is rotated 180 degrees. See section 9.11 for the solution to this problem.


Figure 9.7: Mushroom, spool, and serrated driver pins

Figure 9.7: Mushroom, spool, and serrated driver pins


Figure 9.8: Spacer pins for master keying

Figure 9.8: Spacer pins for master keying

9.11 Driver or Spacer Enters Keyway

Figure 9.9 shows how a spacer or driver pin can enter the keyway when the plug is rotated 180 degrees. You can prevent this by placing the flat side of your pick in the bottom of the keyway before you turn the plug too far. If a spacer or driver does enter the keyway and prevent you from turning the plug, use the flat side of you pick to push the spacer back into the hull. You may need to use the torque wrench to relieve any sheer force that is binding the spacer or driver. If that doesn’t work try raking over the drivers with the pointed side of your pick. If a spacer falls into the keyway completely, the only option is to remove it. A hook shaped piece of spring steel works well for this, though a bent paperclip will work just as well unless the spacer becomes wedged.


Figure 9.9: Spacer or driver can enter keyway

Figure 9.9: Spacer or driver can enter keyway

9.12 Vibration Picking

Vibration picking works by creating a large gap between the key and driver pins. The underlying principle is familiar to anyone who has played pool. When the queue ball strikes another ball squarely, the queue ball stops and the other ball heads off with the same speed and direction as the queue ball. Now imagine a device that kicks the tips of all the key pins. The key pins would transfer their momentum to th driver pins which would fly up into the hull. If you are applying a light torque when this happens, the plug will rotate when all the driv ers are above the sheer line.

9.13 Disk Tumblers

The inexpensive locks found on desksuse metal disks instead of pins. Figure 9.10 shows the basic workings of these locks. The disks have the same outline but differ in the placement of the rectangular cut. These locks are easy to pick with the right tools. Because the disks are placed close together a half-round pick works better than a half-diamond pick (see Figure A.1). You may also need a torque wrench with a narrower head. Use moderate to heavy torque.


Figure 9.10: Workings of a disk tumbler lock

Figure 9.10: Workings of a disk tumbler lock

Back to Index >
Chapter 8 >
Chapter 10 >

MIT Guide to Lock Picking – Chapter 8

This chapter presents a series of exercises that will help you learn the basic skill of lock picking. Some exercises teach a single skill, while others stress the coordination of skills.

When you do these exercises, focus on the skills, not on opening the lock. If you focus on opening the lock, you will get frustrated and your mind will stop learning. The goal of each exercise is to learn something about the particular lock you are holding and something about yourself. If a lock happens to open, focus on the memory of what you were doing and what you felt just before it opened.

These exercises should be practiced in short sessions. After about thirty minutes you will find that your fingers become sore and your mind looses its ability to achiev a relaxed concentration.

8.1 Exercise 1: Bouncing the pick


This exercise helps you learn the skill of applying a fixed pressure with the pick independent of how the pick moves up and down in the lock. Basically you want to learn how to let the pick bounce up and down according to the resistance offered by each pin.

How you hold the pick makes a difference on how easy it is to apply a fixed pressure. You want to hold it in such a way that the pressure comes from your fingers or your wrist. Your elbow and shoulder do not have the dexterity required to pick locks. While you are scrubbing a lock notice which of your joints are fixed, and which are allowed to move. The moving joints are providing the pressure.

One way to hold a pick is to use two fingers to provide a pivot point while another finger levers the pick to provide the pressure. Which fingers you use is a matter of personal choice. Another way to hold the pick is like holding a pencil. With this method, your wrist provides the pressure. If your wrist is providing the pressure, your shoulder and elbow should provide the force to move the pick in and out of the lock. Do not use your wrist to both move the pick and apply pressure.

A good way to get used to the feel of the pick bouncing up and down in the keyway is to try scrubbing over the pins of an open lock. The pins cannot be pushed down, so the pick must adjust to the heights of the pins. Try to feel the pins rattle as the pick moves over them. If you move the pick quickly you can hear the rattle. This same rattling feel will help you recognize when a pin is set correctly. If a pin appears to be set but it doesn’t rattle, then it is false set. False set pins can be fixed by pushing them down farther, or by releasing torque and letting them pop back to their initial position.

One last word of advice. Focus on the tip of the pick. Don’t think about how you are moving the handle; think about how you are moving the tip of the pick.

8.2 Exercise 2: Picking pressure


This exercise will teach you the range of pressures you will need to apply with a pick. When you are starting, just apply pressure when you are drawing the pick out of the lock. Once you have mastered that, try applying pressure when the pick is moving inward.

With the flat side of your pick, push down on the first pin of a lock. Don’t apply any torque to the lock. The amount of pressure you are applying should be just enough to overcome the spring force. This force gives you an idea of minimum pressure you will apply with a pick.

The spring force increases as you push the pin down. See if you can feel this increase.

Now see how it feels to push down the other pins as you pull the pick out of the lock. Start out with both the pick and torque wrench in the lock, but don’t apply any torque. As you draw the pick out of the lock, apply enough pressure to push each pin all the way down.

The pins should spring back as the pick goes past them. Notice the sound that the pins makw as they spring back. Notice the popping feel as a pick goes past each pin. Notice the springy feel as the pick pushes down on each new pin.

To help you focus on these sensations, try counting the number of pins in the lock. Door locks at MIT have seven pins, padlocks usually have four.

To get an idea of the maximum pressure, use the flat side of your pick to push down all the pins in the lock. Sometimes you will need to apply this much pressure to a single pin. If you encounter a new kind of lock, perform this exercise to determine the stiffness of its springs.

8.3 Exercise 3: Picking Torque


This exercise will teach you the range of torque you will need to apply to a lock. It demonstrates the interaction between torque and pressure which was described in chapter 5.

The minimum torque you will use is just enough to overcome the fiction of rotating the plug in the hull. Use your torque wrench to rotate the plug until it stops. Notice how much torque is needed to move the plug before the pins bind. This force can be quite high for locks that have been left out in the rain. The minimum torque fo padlocks includes the force of a spring that is attached between the plug and the shackle olt.

To get a feel for the maximum value of torque, use the flat side of the pick to push all the pins down, and try applying enough torque to make the pins stay down after the pick is removed. If your torque wrench has a twist in it, you may not be able to hold down more than a few pins.

If you use too much torque and too much pressure you can get into a situation like the one you just created. The key pins are pushed too far into the hull and the torque is sufficient to hold them there.

The range of picking torque can be found by gradually increasing the torque while scrubbing the pins with the pick. Some of the pins will become harder to push down. Gradually increase the torque until some of the pins set. These pins will loose their springiness. Keeping the torque fixed, use the pick to scrub the pins a few times to see if other pins will set.

The most common mistake of beginners is to use too much torque. Use this exercise to find the minimum torque required to pick the lock.

8.4 Exercise 4: Identifying Set Pins


While you are picking a lock, try to identify which pins are set. You can tell a pin is set because it will have a slight give. That is, the pin can be pushed down a short distance with s light pressure, but itbecomes hard to move after that distance (see chapter 6 for an explanation). When you remove the light pressure, the pin springsk bac up slightly. Set pins also rattle if you flick them with the pick. Try listening for that sound.

Run the pick over the pins and try to decide whether the set pins are in the front or back of the lock (or both). Try identifying exactly which pins are set. Remember that pin one is the frontmost pin (i.e., the pin that a key touches first). The most important skill of lock picking is the ability to recognize correctly set pins. This exercise will teach you that skill.

Try repeating this exercise with the plug turning in the other direction. If the front pins set when the plug is turned one way, the back pins will set when the plug is turned the other way. See Figure 6.2 for an explanation.

One way to verify how many pins are set is to release the torque, andt coun the clicks as the pins snap back to their initial position. Try this. Try to notice the difference in sound between the snap of a single pin and the snap of two pins at once. A pin that has been false set will also make a snapping sound.

Try this exercise with different amounts of torque and pressure. You should notice that a larger torque requires a larger pressure to make pins set correctly. If the pressure is too high, the pins will be jammed into the hull and stay there.

8.5 Exercise 5: Projection


As you are doing the exercises try building a picture in your mind of what is going on. The picture does not have to be visual, it could be a rough understanding of which pins are set and how much resistance tou are encountering from each pin. One way to foster this picture building is to try to remember your sensations and beliefs about a lock just before it opened. When a lock opens, don’t think “that’s over”, think “what happened”.

This exercise requires a lock that you find easy to pick. It will help you refine the visual skills you need to master lock picking. Pick the lok, and try to remember how the process felt. Rehearse in your mind how everything feels when the lock is picked properly. Basically you want to create a movie that records the process of picking the lock. Visualize the motion of your muscles as they apply the correct pressure and torque, and feel the resistance encountered by the pick. Now pick the lock again trying to match your actions to the movie.

By repeating this exercise, you are learning how to formulate detailed commands for your muscles and how to interpret feedback from your senses. The mental rehearsal teaches you how to build a visual understanding of the lock and how to recognize the major steps of picking it.

Back to Index >
Chapter 7 >
Chapter 9 >

MIT Guide to Lock Picking – Chapter 7

Simple lock picking is a trade that anyone can learn. However, advanced lock picking is a craft that requires mechanical sensitivity, physical dexterity, visual concentration and analytic thinking. If you strive to excel at lock picking, you will grow in many ways.

7.1 Mechanical Skills

Learning how to pull the pick over the pins is surprisingly difficult. The problem is that the mechanical skills you learned early in life involved maintaining a fixed position or fixed path for your hands independent of the amount of force required. In lock picking, you must learn how to apply a fixed force independent of the position of your hand. As you pull the pick out of the lock you want to apply a fixed pressure on the pins. The pick should bounce up and down in the keyway according to the resistance offered by each pin.

To pick a lock you need feedback about the effects of your manipulations. To get the feedback, you must train yourself to be sensitive to the sound and feel of the pick passing over the pins. This is a mechanical skill that can only be learned with practice. The exercises will help yo recognize the important information coming from your fingers.

7.2 Zen and the Art of Lock Picking

In order to excel at lock picking, you must train yourself to have a visually reconstructive imagination. The idea is to use information from all your senses to build a picture of what is happening inside the lock as you pick it. Basically, you want to project your sense into the lock to receive a full picture of how it is responding to your manipulations. Once you have learned how to build this picture, it is easy to choose manipulations that will open the lock.

All your senses provide information about the lock. Touch and sound provide the most information, but the other senses can reveal critical information. For example, your nose can tell you whether a lock has been lubricated recently. As a beginner, you will need to use your eyes for hand-eye coordination, but as you improve you will find it unnecessary to look at the lock. In fact, it is better to ignore you eyes and use your sight to build an image of the lock based on the information you receive from your fingers and ears.

The goal of this mental skill is to acquire a relaxed concentration on the lock. Don’t force the concentration. Try to ignore the sensations and thoughts that are not related to the lock. Don’t try to focus on the lock.

7.3 Analytic Thinking

Each lock has its own special characteristics which make picking harder or easier. If you learn to recognize and exploit the “personality traits” of locks, picking will go much faster. Basically, you want to analyze the feedback you get from a lock to diagnose its personality traits and then use your experience to decide on an approach to open the lock. Chapter 9 discusses a large number of common traits and ways to exploit o overcome them.

People underestimate the analytic skills involved in lock picking. They think that the picking tool opens the lock. To them the torque wrench is a passive tool that just puts the lock under the desired stress. Let me propose another way to view the situation. The pick is just running over the pins to get information about the lock. Based on an analysis that information the torque is adjusted to make the pins set at the sheer line. It’s the torque wrench that opens the lock.

Varying the torque as the pick moves in and out of the keyway is general trick that can be used to get around several picking problems. For example, if the middle pins are set, but the end pins are not, you can increase the torque as the pick moves over the middle pins. This will reduce the chances of disturbing the correctly set pins. If some pin doesn’t seem to lift up far enough as the pick passes over it, then try reducing the torque on the next pass.

The skill of adjusting the torque while the pick is moving requires careful coordination between your hands, but as you become better at visualizing the process of picking a lock, you will become better at this important skill.

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Chapter 6 >
Chapter 8 >

Sex, Drugs and Public Hangings – Part 6

Sex, Drugs and Public Hangings
A series by Spiralbound.net on social deviance and punishment in the United States and Europe

Conclusion:
Going into this study, it was my expectation that That non deviant citizens of other Western, industrialized countries would take on more personal responsibility for deviants, and prove more willing to make accommodations for them than Americans. Given this, Americans would, without exception, be more likely than Europeans to label deviant any person addressed by the five social policies in my survey. This is to say that whether a person is on death row for homicide, or poverty stricken and in need of shelter, food, clothing, medical attention or treatment for drug addiction, that person would acquire a label of deviance more quickly in the United States than in Europe.

In two ways, this turned out to be the case. As expected, when it came to sentencing a person to death Americans were decidedly more likely to agree, than Europeans, effectively applying the label of criminal with indelible ink. This label cannot be removed, since the person is to be executed, which tells us that, while not given out lightly, it is applied by Americans with extreme confidence.

Similarly, Americans seem more reluctant than Europeans to remove the label of drug user. This is not to suggest that they to not favor programs designed to help in addiction recovery (55% in fact believed America should have such a nationally funded policy), but to note that far more (76%) of Europeans agreed with this policy and were less likely to be skeptical about the addict’s actual motivation to recover.

The results become more ambiguous however when it comes to questions about nationalized health care and welfare. America and Europe ran pretty much dead even in the statistics here, which, at least initially, suggests that being poor and in need of health care is not thought of as particularly deviant in either culture. Like drug addiction, however, there does seem to be more of a tendency amongst Americans to look at these program’s beneficiaries with distrust, and thus less societal responsibility is accepted by the American individual. This again suggests a willingness but strong reluctance amongst Americans to remove a deviant label.

Finally, there is the question that broke all the rules. Given the fact that United States tends to be more conservative sexually than many European nations, I would have thought, that if anything was to be labeled more deviant in the United States it would be sexuality. Perhaps this is the case, and a willingness to provide nationally funded birth control is not a valid measurement, or perhaps I simply had it wrong. Whatever the case, it would appear, since more Americans than Europeans favor such a program, that sexuality is more likely to receive a deviant label in Europe.

Ultimately, while it does seem that these findings support my original hypothesis, they do so in a slightly different way than I had anticipated. It appears that neither culture is decidedly more or less likely to apply a label of deviance to the acts in question, but rather that Europeans tend to be more willing than Americans to remove a deviant label.

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Sex, Drugs and Public Hangings – Part 5

Sex, Drugs and Public Hangings
A series by Spiralbound.net on social deviance and punishment in the United States and Europe

Results:
So, having examined the overall purpose of this project, the research design and its limitations, the time has come to look at the data, and to see if the findings support my original hypothesis that non deviant citizens of other Western, industrialized countries take on more personal responsibility for deviants, and are more willing than Americans to make accommodations for them. In the first part of this section, I will present a basic overview of the survey results, beginning with the quantitative percentages, then moving on to the qualitative comments for elaboration. In the second part, I will take a moment for the discussion of labeling theory, then move on to discuss the conclusions which can be drawn from this research.

Taking a quick glance at the initial quantitative results, it is unclear if the data supports this study’s hypothesis. See the following table:

Sex Drugs and Public Hangings Table 3

Sex Drugs and Public Hangings Table 3

There exists some supporting evidence when we see that Europeans were far less likely to favor the death penalty, and far more likely to support nationality funded treatment for drug abusers than Americans. These findings come as no surprise because of policies which already exist in our two European countries. Germany has no death penalty what- so-ever, and the United Kingdom abolished this punishment for all ordinary (non-military) offenses in1973. (Heiner p. 221) On a similar note, the United Kingdom tried out “hard line” methods to control drug abuse in the ’70s and ’80s, but only found themselves with “more drugs, more crime and more addicts, so they went back to their way, letting doctors prescribe whatever drug a particular addict was hooked on.” (Heiner p. 190)

Surprisingly, however, the other issues were much closer in the percentages. Americans proved only slightly less likely to support nationality funded health care, and much to my surprise, they were actually more likely to favor financial support for publicly funded birth control and those living in poverty. While these returns are interesting from the standpoint of changing American viewpoints, they hardly support my hypothesis. Even given the likelihood that I had reached a more liberal subset of the American public, these results were far from what I had expected to find. I would clearly have to dig deeper into qualitative meaning behind these answers if I was to have any hope of proving my hypothesis.

Looking through the comments the research subjects made, two things become clear. First, the explanations given by Europeans for supporting social policy designed to aid deviants are filled with decidedly fewer limitations, ifs’, ands’ or buts’ than those given by American subjects. This provides evidence that the tendency to submit a “Yes” answer, simply so that a comment could be given, was indeed artificially inflated by the design of the survey. Secondly, certain national trends seem to emerge with respect to each question, leading to the conclusion that there is at least some homogeny amongst those surveyed. Let us now take the time to view each question individually, comparing the comments made by American respondents with their European counterparts.

Question #1: Do you believe your country should have a death penalty?
From the American perspective the majority (59%) of those surveyed did not believe that there should be a death penalty in the United States. However, particularly when compared with the much lower European return of 9%, there remains a significant percentage of American subjects who favor capital punishment. What were their reasons? Of those nine Americans who answered “Yes” the most common circumstance given under which a death sentence would be acceptable was murder. Some respondents elaborated further, stating, for instance that such a punishment would only be appropriate in the event of the most “heinous” murder, serial killings, or a crime where the victim was “tortured either before or after being killed”, but In short, every American who favored the death penalty cited the killing of another human being as an act under which capital punishment would be acceptable.

In Europe, however, the overwhelming majority of respondents did not believe that their country should have a death penalty. Only two of the twenty-one European subjects answered “Yes” to this question, and of these, only one provided an explanation, stating that execution should only be carried out in the event of first degree murder or rape.

Interestingly, the American legal system does not treat rape as seriously as murder. Certainly this is because the life of the victim is not terminated in the criminal act. I mention this because in addition to murder, (and treason, cited only once) rape was named by three Americans and one European as a reason for the use of capital punishment. Two conclusions can be drawn from this. First, it would seem that the general public of America, and Europe is taking the issue of rape much more seriously than they had in the past, and secondly, since neither Americans or Europeans seem to favor using the death penalty lightly, it would appear that whatever mental condition it is that causes a person to commit rape is being thought of as not only despicable, but untreatable as well.

Question #2: Do you feel health care should be provided by your government?
Generally, those surveyed in the united States and in Europe agreed that there should be some kind of nationalized health care system, which makes it curious that no such program exists in the US. When asked to elaborate on their answers, statements like “Free for all, period.” and ” I think there should be national health care for every citizen of our country – regardless of economic status, race, age, etc.” were quite common throughout both American and European survey returns.

While it seems that many of those favoring nationalized health care from both sides of the Atlantic feel that everyone should receive government health care, Europeans seemed less worried about the prospect of a person receiving free health care without first having paid into the system. Out of the eighteen Europeans and the Nineteen Americans who answered in favor of a nationalized health care plan, five Americans and only one European suggested that treatment should be provided only to those who have paid into the system. Similarly, Six Europeans and only two Americans specifically named the poor as a group who should receive treatment.

In part, since the US does not as of yet have a national health care system, and because of books such as Malcolm K. Sparrow’s “License to Steel”, which discusses the highly automated, easy to take advantage of systems entrusted with processing claims and issuing checks (Sparrow pp. 162 163), it makes sense why Americans tend to be a bit more worried about where the funding for such a program will come from. In general, both groups seem to believe first that their country should provide at least essential health care services, and secondly, that most, if not all citizens should have access to it.

Question #3: Do you believe your country should provide financial support for those living in poverty?
Like socialized medicine, welfare is a social program funded by the public, and as such has the potential of being abused. In other words, it is possible that people may use the service without contributing to the pool of money which funds it. For this reason it makes sense that the answers from this question would be similar to those on nationality funded health care. Indeed this is the case. Seventeen Europeans and twenty-three Americans answered that their respective countries should provide financial support to those living in poverty, and when asked to qualify their answers, most subjects from both Europe and the United States agreed that this program should not be a way of life, but rather a service to those trying to find a job or better their situation.

Americans did however, tend to be a bit more concerned with the possibility of people getting something for nothing. The most common statements amongst US subjects who believe financial aid to the poor should be offered was that this service should provide the basic costs of living such as food, clothing and housing only to those trying to find a job, or unable to work because of disability. One subject wrote for example that “People should receive welfare only for a short time, and during that time, the person should have to prove they are looking for a job by meeting with a counselor twice a week. Welfare needs strict regulations, but in a way that still helps the person receiving it”.

Like the Americans, European respondents believed that welfare should provide for the basic necessities of life. However, statements like, “welfare should be provided under all circumstances, so that people do not die from starvation, and have basic clothing and basic housing” were far more common. Furthermore, the idea that welfare should help the underemployed and working poor was commonly addressed among European respondents, and only twice was it explicitly suggested that this service should be limited to those actively seeking employment. In short, Europeans seemed a good deal more trusting that the welfare system would not be abused.

Question #4: Do you believe your country should provide publicly funded birth control?
Amongst those from United States who responded “Yes” to this question, the almost universal answer was something like “to anyone and everyone who wants it.” Many subjects from Europe also answered this way, but added that birth control should also be provided to teenagers, suggesting, if nothing else, that Europeans are more comfortable with the idea of their children having sex than Americans.

The thing that most amazed me about the results from this question, however, was the number of people who said “No”. It was my original thought that anyone willing to support nationalized medicine or welfare would also support government funded birth control. The final tally did not prove this, showing that out of twenty-one Europeans and twenty-seven Americans surveyed, only nine and seventeen respondents supported such a program respectively. This suggests one of two possible conclusions. Either sex and childbearing are something that both cultures feel is a personal matter and don’t want to see the government getting involved with, or it was thought that by birth control I meant abortion, which is understandably a far more controversial topic than basic prevention methods. In any event, it would seem that Americans are a bit more comfortable with this issue than the Europeans.

Question #5: Do you feel your country should provide treatment for drug abusers?
This final question was inspired by the 60 Minutes episode entitled “Rx Drugs”, in which England’s approach to managing national drug problems was addressed. Unlike the United States, which has declared “war” on drugs, England has decided to fund a program which provides free, “clean” drugs to addicts by way of prescription, thus decriminalizing the act of use. (Heiner p. 189) Knowing about this program, I though it would be interesting to see how well supported public treatment for drug addicts was overseas, and moreover, if Americans were interested in paying the bill to help users overcome their addiction.

In the end, this question came back mostly as I expected. As can be seen by the returns, 76% of European subjects favored such a policy, compared to 55% of Americans. When asked to qualify a “Yes” answer, both groups agreed nearly across the board that anyone who wants help should receive it. One American respondent stated that “Our country should provide similar treatment to England’s program”, and several suggested that treatment should not continue if the patient is not doing his or her part to recover. It was, perhaps a bit surprising that so many Americans favored this type of program, but it seems most are beginning to conclude that the “war on drugs” is not working and have began to seek an alternative.

Because the following interpretation of this data is to be grounded in the school of symbolic interactionism, and labeling theory, it is important, before moving on, that I give a brief overview of of this theoretical framework. Taken from the writings of George Herbert Mead, symbolic interactionism asserts that people learn how to behave based on the subjective meanings of their social interaction “as perceived from the standpoint of the actor.” (Hagen p. 192) In other words, individuals watch how others react to their behavior and apply meaning to their actions based on what they see. Labeling theory, then, “says that individuals are deviant mainly because they have been labeled as deviant by social control agencies or others.” (Hagen p. 192) There is, based on this theory, nothing intrinsically deviant in the criminal act itself, only in the reaction of the audience and in the label that is applied to the actor; “that is, a crime is a label, not an act.” (Hagen p.192)

By this assertion, we are moving the focus of the study away from the deviant people of America and Europe and on to the “law abiding citizens” of these countries who react to and label deviance. The question now becomes not how deviant people are dealt with on both sides of the Atlantic, but exactly which acts cause each respective society to apply a label of deviance.

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