Karl Rovian Math 101

Donald Rumsfeld has stepped down. Democrats have won a sweeping majority in the house of representatives and as Webb declares victory in Virginia and Tester pulls out a victory in Montana, it seems that the Senate is falling into Democratic hands as well.

Republicans are famous for pointing fingers at their foes, while circling their wagons around their friends. They yell at Clinton for his extra-marital exploits, but try to burry Foley’s predatory advances on congressional pages. They refuse to talk in detail about military opperations, but leak the names of clandestine CIA agents as soon as they become a political threat.

Then there is the Republican outrage over “New Math” and “Fuzzy Math” back in the earlier days of their regime. It seems that they have always claimed to have a copyright on the one and only true math, but they’ve never come right out and said it quite so much as Karl Rove did on October 24. Rove, in an interview with NPR’s Robert Siegel, insisted that he had access to a far greater number of polls than the average person, and that any suggestion that Democrats would take over either house of congress was laughable because he was using “the math”.

Well, MR. Rove, I think you need to go back to the fourth grade because you either forgot to carry a one, or you rounded WAY the hell up when you should have rounded down. I sincerely hope that you are not the one creating the curriculum for the “no child left behind” act.

Below is the transcript of that interview:

MR. SIEGEL OF NPR: We’re in the home stretch, though. And many might consider you on the optimistic end of realism about —

MR. ROVE: Not that you would be exhibiting a bias or anything like that. You’re just making a comment.

MR. SIEGEL: I’m looking at all the same polls that you’re looking at every day.

MR. ROVE: No you’re not. No you’re not!

MR. SIEGEL: No, I’m not —

MR. ROVE: I’m looking at 68 polls a week. You may be looking at four or five public polls a week that talk about attitudes nationally, but that do not impact the outcome –

[Rove is claiming access to secret polls that he never cites any data from, indicates the origin of, or otherwise documents the existence of. When asked for examples of races Republicans are winning, Rove turns to races we all know they’re winning based on “public” polls. Needless to say, thousands of public polls report on individual races, not just “attitudes nationally”.]

MR. SIEGEL: — name races between — certainly Senate race

MR. ROVE: Well, like the polls today showing that Corker’s ahead in Tennessee; or the race — polls showing that Allen is pulling away in the Virginia Senate race.

[Yes, we knew about those, Karl. But those still leave the Republicans losing the House and possibly even the Senate.]

MR. SIEGEL: Leading Webb in Virginia. Yes.

MR. ROVE: Yeah, exactly.

MR. SIEGEL: Have you seen the DeWine race and the Santorum race and — I don’t want to –

MR. ROVE: Yeah. Look, I’m looking at all these Robert and adding them up. And I add up to a Republican Senate and a Republican House. You may end up with a different math, but you’re entitled to your math. I’m entitled to “the” math.

Montana Meth Project

I’m not naive enough to believe that the “war on drugs” is anymore winnable than this country’s ludicrous “war on terror”, but those who know me, know that I hate drugs… So, I was happy to learn that, facing a huge meth-amphetamine problem, an organization backed by corporations called The Montana Meth Project has sprung to life and made a seriously concerted effort to dissuade Montana’s youth from using meth.

Yep… You read that one correctly. I’m usually not one to give corporations much credit since they are usually happy to ignore civic responsibility if it will increase the bottom line for their shareholders, but in this case, a group of them have seriously stepped up to the plate, and are attempting to make a real difference.

Using some pretty hard-core TV, radio, and billboard ads, the Montana Meth Project is trying to keep kids off meth by putting the consequences of addiction right in front of their faces. They’ve realized that the usual anti-drug image of police officers droning on about jail time and fines if you are caught with drugs only reinforces the “us against them” attitude and often turns kids towards drugs rather than away from them. By instead focusing on the much more real and humanistic repercussions of drug addiction, they are hoping that Montana’s youth will avoid meth not to simply doge a meaningless fine, but to avoid screwing up their lives.

I, for one, think this is a great idea, and hold myself as an example of why it will work. I have little to no respect for the law, but I do have respect for my own life, health, and well-being. It is for these reasons alone that I have never tried drugs. Let’s hope Montana’s kids find these messages compelling.


Montana Meth Project PSA – That Guy from Cliff Pearson on Vimeo.


Montana Meth Project PSA – Just Once from Cliff Pearson on Vimeo.


Montana Meth Project PSA – Laundry from Cliff Pearson on Vimeo.


Montana Meth Project PSA – Eybrows from Cliff Pearson on Vimeo.


Montana Meth Project PSA – Bathroom from Cliff Pearson on Vimeo.