Another Used Sun Fire T2000 For Sale

STATUS: Sold
We have another used Sun Fire T2000 server. Since the first one was sold in less than 24 hours, I thought it would be nice to offer this one up to this site’s readers as well. It has never been used in production and is in like-new condition.

  • Sun Fire T2000 Server
  • 8 core 1.0 Ghz UltraSPARC T1 processor
  • 16GB DDR memory (16 1GB DIMMs)
  • 2X 73GB 10,000PRM disk drives
  • 1X DVD-ROM/CDRW drive
  • Serial Number: 0639VB0053
  • Starting Bid: $13,000

If you are interested, or would like any further information, please leave a comment or visit this link. Our university campus policy states that big ticket items like this must be sold using an auction style bidding system. I should add, however, that most items in the surplus system are sold with only one bid, so please don’t let the process discourage you if you are at all interested.

Used Sun Fire T2000 For Sale

STATUS: Sold
The University where I work is currently selling a used Sun Fire T2000 server. Since many of this site’s readers are fellow Solaris administrators, I thought it would be nice to offer it up to them. It has never been used in production and is in like-new condition.

  • Sun Fire T2000 Server
  • 4 core 1.0 Ghz UltraSPARC T1 processor
  • 8GB DDR memory (16 512MB DIMMs)
  • 2X 73GB 10,000PRM disk drives
  • 1X DVD-ROM/CDRW drive
  • Serial Number: 0617NNN1FY
  • Starting Bid: $6,000

If you are interested, or would like any further information, please leave a comment of visit this link. Our campus policy states that big ticket items like this must be sold using an auction style bidding system. I should add, however, that most items in the surplus system are sold with only one bid, so please don’t let the process discourage you if you are at all interested.

Taking Disk Cylinders From Swap on Solaris 8

Kids… DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME! If this is not done exactly right, you will render your system unbootable and corrupt your data. That being said, under some circumstances you can take some space from your swap partition and add it to an unused one without initializing your entire disk. This is particularly useful if you decide you want to use DiskSuite to mirror your system disk, but have not allocated the 100MB partition that is needed to hold the state databases. As always, BACK EVERYTHING UP FIRST. Better yet, make two backups and store them on two different systems. This is a risky procedure, and you don’t want to lose any data!

You can also use my instructions for copying a Solaris boot drive to a disk with a different partition layout as a safer alternative.

The first thing you need to do is figure out if your disk layout will allow for this procedure. Usually the swap partition is the second one on the disk, making it partition number 1 (Partition number 0 is root). If partition number 1 is swap on your system, and partition number 3 or 4 are unused, you are in good shape, and this should work. To figure this out, you should do something like this:

# format
Select the boot disk – usually disk 0
Specify disk (enter its number): 0
format> partition
format> print

This will show you the current disk layout.


Current partition table (original):
Total disk cylinders available: 24620 + 2 (reserved cylinders)

Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders         Size            Blocks
  0       root    wm       0 -   725        1.00GB    (726/0/0)    2097414
  1       swap    wu     726 -  9436       11.90GB    (8635/0/0)  24946515
  2     backup    wm       0 - 24619       33.92GB    (24620/0/0) 71127180
  3 unassigned    wm       0                0         (0/0/0)            0
  4 unassigned    wm       0                0         (0/0/0)            0
  5        usr    wm    9437 - 10888        2.00GB    (1452/0/0)   4194828
  6        var    wm   10889 - 18148       10.00GB    (7260/0/0)  20974140
  7 unassigned    wm   18149 - 24619        8.91GB    (6471/0/0)  18694719

Here we see that partitions 3 and 4 are unused and directly after partition 1, so we can take some space from swap and assign it to one of these. Partition 2 is, of course the entire disk. I have not tried it, so I don’t know if you could assign non-sequential cylinders to a partition that is not directly after swap.

So to take some space from partition 1 and add it to partition 3, the first thing we have to do is disable swap, so the format utility will let us change it.

Comment out the following lines in your /etc/vfstab file and reboot the system.


#/dev/dsk/c1t0d0s1         -       -               swap    -       no      -
#swap    -       /tmp    tmpfs   -       yes     - 

This will bring the system up without swap enabled. You can now edit the disk label. Remember that our cylinders need to be sequential, so always work in cylinders when using the format utility.

Re-enter the format utility, select your system disk and view the partition table:

# format
Select the boot disk – usually disk 0
Specify disk (enter its number): 0
format> partition
format> print

Again we wee that partitions 3 and 4 are unused.


Current partition table (original):
Total disk cylinders available: 24620 + 2 (reserved cylinders)

Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders         Size            Blocks
  0       root    wm       0 -   725        1.00GB    (726/0/0)    2097414
  1       swap    wu     726 -  9436       11.90GB    (8635/0/0)  24946515
  2     backup    wm       0 - 24619       33.92GB    (24620/0/0) 71127180
  3 unassigned    wm       0                0         (0/0/0)            0
  4 unassigned    wm       0                0         (0/0/0)            0
  5        usr    wm    9437 - 10888        2.00GB    (1452/0/0)   4194828
  6        var    wm   10889 - 18148       10.00GB    (7260/0/0)  20974140
  7 unassigned    wm   18149 - 24619        8.91GB    (6471/0/0)  18694719

The first thing we need to do is take some cylinders away from partition 1. In this example, we are looking to make partition 3 roughly 100MB, so we need to take about 75 cylinders from partition 1 so that we can add it to partition 3. Parititon 1 ends at cylinder 9436, so we need to subtract 75 from that number. 9436 – 75 = 9361, so that is the new ending cylinder for partition 1. We then subtract the beginning cylinder (726) from that number to give us the new total number of cylinders for partition 1. 9361 – 726 = 8635, so this is the number we enter when format asks for the size of the partition. Like so:


partition> 1
Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders         Size            Blocks
  1       swap    wu     726 -  9360       11.90GB    (8635/0/0)  24946515

Enter partition id tag[swap]: 
Enter partition permission flags[wu]: 
Enter new starting cyl[726]: 
Enter partition size[24946615b, 9436c, 12880.92mb, 12.00gb]: 8635c
partition>

Now we have to add these 75 cylinders to partition 3.


partition> 3
Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders         Size            Blocks
  3 unassigned    wm       0                0          (0/0/0)            0

Enter partition id tag[unassigned]: 
Enter partition permission flags[wm]: 
Enter new starting cyl[0]:9361
Enter partition size[0b, 0c, 0.00mb, 0.00gb]:75c
partition>

Print out the new partition table to make sure everything lines up correctly:


partition> print
Current partition table (original):
Total disk cylinders available: 24620 + 2 (reserved cylinders)

Part      Tag    Flag     Cylinders         Size            Blocks
  0       root    wm       0 -   725        1.00GB    (726/0/0)    2097414
  1       swap    wu     726 -  9360       11.90GB    (8635/0/0)  24946515
  2     backup    wm       0 - 24619       33.92GB    (24620/0/0) 71127180
  3 unassigned    wm    9361 -  9436      107.21MB    (76/0/0)      219564
  4 unassigned    wm       0                0         (0/0/0)            0
  5        usr    wm    9437 - 10888        2.00GB    (1452/0/0)   4194828
  6        var    wm   10889 - 18148       10.00GB    (7260/0/0)  20974140
  7 unassigned    wm   18149 - 24619        8.91GB    (6471/0/0)  18694719

Partition 1 ends at cylinder 9360, and partition 3 picks right up at cylinder 9361. Partition 3 ends at cylinder 9436, and partition 5 begins at cylinder 9437. Partition 4, of course, remains unused. Since none of the cylinders overlap, we can go ahead and write the disk label out. DO NOT DO THIS if you have any doubt at all about what you have just done. By writing out the disk label, you could corrupt the data on your formated filesystems if any cylinders overlap into them. The format utility is usually pretty smart about keeping you from making mistakes, but be very careful anyway! You don’t want to end up with scrambled eggs on a disk that has valuable data on it.

partition> label
This writes out the disk label, so you can now exit the format utility and re-enable swap in your /etc/vfstab file. Simply uncomment out the following two lines and reboot the system.


/dev/dsk/c1t0d0s1         -       -               swap    -       no      -
swap    -       /tmp    tmpfs   -       yes     -

Reboot your system, and if all goes well, it will come up, and you will see that partition 3 will have a little over 100MB on it. Usually people want to do this so they can store the DiskSuite meta database on the newly created partition. If this is the case for you, you can now move on to mirroring the system disk.

Sun Happy Meal Card???

So we all know that Sun is a cool company with a great sense of humor, but they really outdid themselves when they named this combination SCSI / Ethernet card Happy Meal!

It’s a pretty old card, and honestly I had forgotten that I had installed it in my test system until I setup REL 3 on it last week. For some reason, the Red Hat installer wanted to remove the device before adding it back in. Luckily I had my camera with me when I saw the hardware detection message pop up.

Solaris Systems With Multiple Names Have Trouble Mounting CD’s

If you have a Solaris box with multiple names, you might have trouble mounting CD’s if the primary name is different from the one you gave the machine at install time. This is because of the CRAZY way Solaris goes about auto-mounting its optical media.

Here is a 10,000 foot view of how Solaris automounts a CD:

The disk is inserted
vold checks and sees that there is a disk inserted
vold connects to inetd, which in turn, starts smserverd
smserverd mounts the disk and all is right with the world

All this depends, however, that:

1) Vold is running
# /etc/init.d/volmgt start

2) This line is not commented in /etc/inetd.conf
100155/1 tli rpc/ticotsord wait root /usr/lib/smedia/rpc.smserverd rpc.smserverd

And 3) The current hostname of the machine is listed in /etc/net/ticotsord/hosts.

This file should looks something like this:

——-SNIP——
#ident “@(#)hosts 1.2 92/07/14 SMI” /* SVr4.0 1.2 */
# RPC Hosts
micky micky
minny minny
——/SNIP——

Micky and minny, of course are the hostnames you have given the machine. You can pretty much just make it mirror the /etc/hosts file.

Once these three criteria are met, a machine with multiple names should be able to automount a CD with no problems.

PHP 5.0.5 Make Install Error

After getting PHP 5.0.5 to compile on my Solaris 9 server, I got the following error when doing the make install:

ld.so.1: php: fatal: relocation error: file /u01/packages/src/php-5.0.5/sapi/cli/php: symbol xmlRelaxNGCleanupTypes: referenced symbol not found
Killed

make[1]: *** [install-pear-installer] Error 137
make: *** [install-pear] Error 2

Turns out that the Sun XML packages are stomping all over the xml2 package from http://xmlsoft.org/. Simply removing the following two packages allowed the make install to complete.

# pkgrm SUNWlxml
# pkgrm SUNWlxmlx

Solaris X86 Compatible RAID Controller

Every time I have to spec a solution using Solaris, I always have to answer a bunch of questions in meetings about why Sun is so costly compared to Dell servers. Usually the reason for the higher price is not the servers (especially with X86 sun), but rather the storage. Since Sun does not offer a system with a RAID card, you always have to purchase a high-end disk enclosure that is capable of performing the RAID functions unless you want the performance degradation that comes with software RAID.

The good news is that there is finally a really nice PCI RAID card that works with Solaris! The bad news is that it only works with X86 Solaris, and Sun only goes so far as to say that it is”reported to work“.

Anyhow, no matter. Here is the deal:

According to Sun Big Admin, the Mylex Accelaraid 150 is reported to work with Solaris 9 04/04 to Solaris 10 03/05 (read Solaris 9 and 10 X86). The firmware and bios on the card needs to be: BIOS Version 4.10-50; Firmware 4.08-37.

Pity that there still does not seem to be a RAID controller that works with SPARC hardware. If someone would come up with that, it would make my life as a Solaris administrator a whole lot easier.