Solaris 8 SAN Frustrations

Getting Solaris 8 to light up a Qlogic QLA2310 Fibre Channel card using the SUNWqlc and SUNWqlcx drivers can be frustrating enough, but the headaches are only beginning if you want to connect it to a SAN and you don’t have all the right packages installed.

Last week, I installed the QLA2310 in a Sun Fire V210 running Solaris 8. I installed the latest versions of SUNWqlc, SUNWqlcx and SUNWsan. After doing a reboot -- -r, the system came up and attached the driver to the card. I zoned it in the fabric and logged into Navisphere, where the WWN showed up, but neither Power Path or the Navisphere host agent could communicate with the CLARiiON. I also could not see any of the LUNS I had presented.

I thought it was strange that the CLARiiON could see the host, but the host could not see the CLARiiON.

I ran:
luxadm -e port
Which returned:

Found path to 1 HBA ports

/devices/pci@1d,700000/SUNW,qlc@1/fp@0,0:devctl                    CONNECTED

Clearly, it could see the HBA.

I ran:

ls -l /dev/cfg
total 8
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root  root   38 Nov 30 14:31 c0 ->
../../devices/pci@1e,600000/ide@d:scsi
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root  root   39 Nov 30 14:31 c1 ->
../../devices/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2:scsi
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root  root   41 Nov 30 14:31 c2 ->
../../devices/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2,1:scsi
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root  root   48 Dec  4 13:49 c3 ->
../../devices/pci@1d,700000/SUNW,qlc@1/fp@0,0:fc

The card was C3… This becomes useful later when we have to config it.

I ran:
cfgadm -al -o show_FCP_dev
Which retuned:
cfgadm: Configuration administration not supported

There it was… I didn’t have the complete SAN package installed. I hadn’t done this in a few years, so I had forgotten all the packages I had to add to get the Sun SAN package working correctly… There are many.

Happily, Sun has now packaged them in a nice “SAN_4.4.12_install_it.tar.Z”, which you can get from their website if you have a username. It installs everything for you in the right order.

The only thing left to do was another reboot -- -r and run cfgadm -c configure c3 to config the device. After this everything started working nicely.

Registering Solaris CLARiiON Hosts With QLA 2310 HBAs

Sun Microsystems likes the QLA 2310 Fiber Channel HBA. It’s only a 2Gig card, but it works with the Sun native driver, which makes it wonderful for us Solaris Administrators. Unfortunately, it does not integrate perfectly with EMC CLARiiON SANs because it does not register properly with Navasphere. Even if you manually register the host, the LUNs will not be presented to the host because the agent can’t pass commands to the array.

To remedy this situation on my Solaris 8 host, I used the following procedure:

Edit the /etc/system file and add the following line:

set fcp:ssfcp_enable_auto_configuration=1

Next, I rebooted my Solaris host with the “-r” flag:

reboot -- -r

Next I checked Navisphere to make sure my paths have logged in. They were, so I logged into the Solaris host and ran the following commands:

cfgadm
devfsadm
format

I then saw the storage that was presented to my host. Finally, I restarted the Navisphere agent and started using my new LUNs.

Another Used Sun Fire T2000 For Sale

STATUS: Sold
We have another used Sun Fire T2000 server. Since the first one was sold in less than 24 hours, I thought it would be nice to offer this one up to this site’s readers as well. It has never been used in production and is in like-new condition.

  • Sun Fire T2000 Server
  • 8 core 1.0 Ghz UltraSPARC T1 processor
  • 16GB DDR memory (16 1GB DIMMs)
  • 2X 73GB 10,000PRM disk drives
  • 1X DVD-ROM/CDRW drive
  • Serial Number: 0639VB0053
  • Starting Bid: $13,000

If you are interested, or would like any further information, please leave a comment or visit this link. Our university campus policy states that big ticket items like this must be sold using an auction style bidding system. I should add, however, that most items in the surplus system are sold with only one bid, so please don’t let the process discourage you if you are at all interested.

Used Sun Fire T2000 For Sale

STATUS: Sold
The University where I work is currently selling a used Sun Fire T2000 server. Since many of this site’s readers are fellow Solaris administrators, I thought it would be nice to offer it up to them. It has never been used in production and is in like-new condition.

  • Sun Fire T2000 Server
  • 4 core 1.0 Ghz UltraSPARC T1 processor
  • 8GB DDR memory (16 512MB DIMMs)
  • 2X 73GB 10,000PRM disk drives
  • 1X DVD-ROM/CDRW drive
  • Serial Number: 0617NNN1FY
  • Starting Bid: $6,000

If you are interested, or would like any further information, please leave a comment of visit this link. Our campus policy states that big ticket items like this must be sold using an auction style bidding system. I should add, however, that most items in the surplus system are sold with only one bid, so please don’t let the process discourage you if you are at all interested.

Sun Happy Meal Card???

So we all know that Sun is a cool company with a great sense of humor, but they really outdid themselves when they named this combination SCSI / Ethernet card Happy Meal!

It’s a pretty old card, and honestly I had forgotten that I had installed it in my test system until I setup REL 3 on it last week. For some reason, the Red Hat installer wanted to remove the device before adding it back in. Luckily I had my camera with me when I saw the hardware detection message pop up.

Solaris Automounter

Whenever you’re using NFS mount points, it’s really nice to use some type of automounter. Linux and FreeBSD use AMD to accomplish this, but Solaris uses automountd, and it’s fun and easy to use… Here is an example of a configuration that will automatically mount an NFS share and unmount it after 5 minuets of inactivity.

We have a system called micky which has an NFS point shared to a system called minny as /shareme.
We can see that it is set up in the /etc/dfs/dfstab file on micky:

share -F nfs -o ro=minny.yourdomain.com -d “NFS ShareMe” /shareme

The above will share the directory read-only. If you would like to map the directory as root and be able to write to it, the command would look more like this:

share -F nfs -o rw,root=minny.yourdomain.com -d “NFS ShareMe” /shareme

You can run the share command on micky to check to make sure it is shared:

# share
– /shareme ro=minny.yourdomain.com “NFS ShareMe”

If it’s not shared, run shareall to share it:

# shareall

Now, jump on over to minny and add the following line to /etc/auto_master:

/- auto_direct

Automountd will now look in /etc/auto_direct for direct mount points.

Next edit /etc/auto_direct and add the following line:

/micky-shareme micky:/shareme

Now, create the directory for the NFS mount point on minny:

# mkdir /micky-shareme

Finally, run the auromount command on minny to inform the daemon of the changes:

# automount

That should do it… Have fun with your new automount NFS share.

More information on this can be found here

Solaris Systems With Multiple Names Have Trouble Mounting CD’s

If you have a Solaris box with multiple names, you might have trouble mounting CD’s if the primary name is different from the one you gave the machine at install time. This is because of the CRAZY way Solaris goes about auto-mounting its optical media.

Here is a 10,000 foot view of how Solaris automounts a CD:

The disk is inserted
vold checks and sees that there is a disk inserted
vold connects to inetd, which in turn, starts smserverd
smserverd mounts the disk and all is right with the world

All this depends, however, that:

1) Vold is running
# /etc/init.d/volmgt start

2) This line is not commented in /etc/inetd.conf
100155/1 tli rpc/ticotsord wait root /usr/lib/smedia/rpc.smserverd rpc.smserverd

And 3) The current hostname of the machine is listed in /etc/net/ticotsord/hosts.

This file should looks something like this:

——-SNIP——
#ident “@(#)hosts 1.2 92/07/14 SMI” /* SVr4.0 1.2 */
# RPC Hosts
micky micky
minny minny
——/SNIP——

Micky and minny, of course are the hostnames you have given the machine. You can pretty much just make it mirror the /etc/hosts file.

Once these three criteria are met, a machine with multiple names should be able to automount a CD with no problems.