IFCONFIG Does Not give You Link Status; ETHTOOL Does

For some reason that is a complete mystery to me, RHEL does not give you the link status when you run # ifconfig -a. This makes it incredibly hard to debug link integrity issues! Buried amongst all of Red Hat’s proprietary commands, however, is a utility called ethtool, which does give you the status of your link.

Since ethtool is used for querying settings of an ethernet device and changing them, it does a lot more than just give link status. Amongst other things, you can use it to turn on or off autonegotiation on your network card. Run # /sbin/ethtool -h for full usage.

Here’s how you use it to see if your server has link:

# /sbin/ethtool eth0

You should see something like this:

Settings for eth0:
        Supported ports: [ TP ]
        Supported link modes:   10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full 
                                100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full 
                                1000baseT/Full 
        Supports auto-negotiation: Yes
        Advertised link modes:  10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full 
                                100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full 
                                1000baseT/Full 
        Advertised auto-negotiation: Yes
        Speed: 1000Mb/s
        Duplex: Full
        Port: Twisted Pair
        PHYAD: 1
        Transceiver: internal
        Auto-negotiation: on
        Supports Wake-on: g
        Wake-on: d
        Link detected: yes

Getting ntpd to work correctly on RHEL

When many new servers are delivered from the factory, the system clock is way off. Most UNIX systems run “ntpd” to keep the time in sync with internet time servers, which are, in turn synchronized against an atomic clock. This results in a system time that is very very close to the “actual” time of day. The downside, however, is that even a properly configured “ntpd” will not synchronize the system clock if it is too far out of sync with the time server. To remedy this, we first have to run “ntpdate” to get the system clock close to the correct time, and then enable “ntpd” to keep it there.

The first thing we have to do is “ntpd” to free up the port for “ntpdate”:

[root@server /]# /sbin/service ntpd stop
Shutting down ntpd:                                        [  OK  ]

This frees up the port for ntpdate. Next we run:

[root@server /]# /usr/sbin/ntpdate time.apple.com

Now the time should be set correctly. We then change the default time servers to something like the following in /etc/ntp.conf:

# --- OUR TIMESERVERS -----
time-a.timefreq.bldrdoc.gov
time-b.timefreq.bldrdoc.gov
time-c.timefreq.bldrdoc.gov

We can use any time server we want, but I like these and find them to be reliable.

Finally, start backup up your “ntpd” service, and your all set to go.

[root@server /]# /sbin/service ntpd start
Starting ntpd:                                        [  OK  ]

Remember to use “chkconfig” to make sure “ntpd” is enabled to come up when the system starts.

Installing OpenGroupWare 1.1.5 on RHEL 3

OpenGroupWare is an open source groupware package intended as an alternative to proprietary applications such as Exchange and PostPath. It is fairly robust in its feature set, and even integrates well with MS Outlook.

Its strongest points, in my opinion are that it does not depend in any way on Active Directory, and that it integrates well with open source standards like Open LDAP and University of Washington IMAP. Its downsides are that the documentation is sparse and scattered, that is is backed with PostgreSQL rather than MySQL, and that the package is bundled into a TON of RPM’s.

I have not tried installing it from source, though I suspect that it would not be much more work than using the RPM’s. Anyhow, if you want to install it for yourself, here are some quick scripts to help you, as well as some quick cookbook instructions. I installed it on RHEL 3 Workstation, though I suspect that it would work most Linux distributions.

The first thing we have to do is install the foundation for OpenGroupWare From the RHEL CD’s or Website:

Install apache
Install PostgreSQL
Install PostgreSQL-devel
Install php
Install php_PostgreSQL

Next, run the following commands to get the database and webserver started:

# /sbin/chkconfig httpd on
# /sbin/chkconfig postgresql on
# /sbin/service postgresql start
# /sbin/service httpd start

Sendmail should already be installed and running, but if not, you will have to install it as well.

OK, so I said before that there are a TON of RPM’s that you will have to install. These can be found at the OpenGroupWare website. Get them however you want, but if you have “wget” installed, you can use my script to fetch everything you need. You can omit the “devel” packages if you don’t want to install the source code.

  1. ###### SNIP #######
  2. #!/bin/sh
  3. #GetOpenGroupWare.sh
  4. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-gnustep_make-1.10.0-0.i386.rpm
  5. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-xml-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  6. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-xml-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  7. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/ThirdParty/libfoundation11-1.1.3-r155.0.i386.rpm
  8. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/ThirdParty/libfoundation11-devel-1.1.3-r155.0.i386.rpm
  9. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-core-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  10. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-core-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  11. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-appserver-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  12. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-appserver-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  13. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-gdl1-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  14. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-gdl1-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  15. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-ldap-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  16. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-ldap-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  17. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-ldap-tools-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  18. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-mime-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  19. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-mime-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  20. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-logic-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  21. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-logic-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  22. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-logic-tools-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  23. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-docapi-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  24. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-docapi-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  25. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-docapi-db-project-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  26. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-docapi-db-project-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  27. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-docapi-fs-project-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  28. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-docapi-fs-project-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  29. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-core-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  30. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-core-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  31. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-app-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  32. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-environment-1.1.5-0.i386.rpm
  33. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-ical-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  34. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-ical-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  35. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/sope-4.5.8-sixtyfour/sope45-gdl1-postgresql-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  36. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/mod_ngobjweb-2.0.46-r1323.0.i386.rpm
  37. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-database-setup-1.1.5-0.i386.rpm
  38. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-pda-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  39. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-pda-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  40. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-theme-blue-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  41. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-theme-default-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  42. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-theme-kde-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  43. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-theme-ooo-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  44. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-theme-orange-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  45. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-tools-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  46. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-calendar-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  47. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-contact-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  48. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-mailer-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  49. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-mailer-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  50. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-news-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  51. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-project-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  52. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-basque-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  53. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-de-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  54. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-dk-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  55. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-en-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  56. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-es-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  57. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-fr-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  58. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-hu-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  59. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-it-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  60. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-jp-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  61. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-nl-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  62. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-no-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  63. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-pl-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  64. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-pt-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  65. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-ptbr-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  66. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-resource-sk-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  67. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-webui-task-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  68. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-xmlrpcd-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  69. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-zidestore-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  70. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-zidestore-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  71. wget http://download.opengroupware.org/nightly/packages/rhel3/releases/opengroupware-1.1.5-moveon/ogo-meta-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  72. ###### /SNIP #######

Ok, so now we have a directory filled up wit RPM’s. Many of these have a lot of dependancies, so the order of install is important. The script below has them in the correct order, so you can either use it as a reference to install them yourself, or just save the script in the directory that has all your RPM’s and run it. Your choice.

  1. ###### SNIP #######
  2. # InstallOpenGroupware.sh
  3. #!/sbin/sh
  4. rpm -Uvh ogo-gnustep_make-1.10.0-0.i386.rpm
  5. rpm -Uvh sope45-xml-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  6. rpm -Uvh sope45-xml-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  7. rpm -Uvh libfoundation11-1.1.3-r155.0.i386.rpm
  8. rpm -Uvh libfoundation11-devel-1.1.3-r155.0.i386.rpm
  9. rpm -Uvh sope45-core-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  10. rpm -Uvh sope45-core-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  11. rpm -Uvh sope45-mime-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  12. rpm -Uvh sope45-mime-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  13. rpm -Uvh sope45-appserver-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  14. rpm -Uvh sope45-appserver-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  15. rpm -Uvh sope45-gdl1-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  16. rpm -Uvh sope45-gdl1-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  17. rpm -Uvh sope45-ldap-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  18. rpm -Uvh sope45-ldap-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  19. rpm -Uvh sope45-ldap-tools-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  20. rpm -Uvh ogo-logic-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  21. rpm -Uvh ogo-logic-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  22. rpm -Uvh ogo-logic-tools-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  23. rpm -Uvh ogo-docapi-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  24. rpm -Uvh ogo-docapi-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  25. rpm -Uvh ogo-docapi-db-project-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  26. rpm -Uvh ogo-docapi-db-project-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  27. rpm -Uvh ogo-docapi-fs-project-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  28. rpm -Uvh ogo-docapi-fs-project-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  29. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-core-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  30. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-app-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm ogo-theme-default-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm ogo-webui-resource-en-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm ogo-webui-resource-de-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  31. rpm -Uvh ogo-environment-1.1.5-0.i386.rpm
  32. rpm -Uvh sope45-ical-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  33. rpm -Uvh sope45-ical-devel-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  34. rpm -Uvh sope45-gdl1-postgresql-4.5.8-r1321.0.i386.rpm
  35. rpm -Uvh mod_ngobjweb-2.0.46-r1323.0.i386.rpm
  36. rpm -Uvh ogo-database-setup-1.1.5-0.i386.rpm
  37. rpm -Uvh ogo-pda-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  38. rpm -Uvh ogo-pda-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  39. rpm -Uvh ogo-theme-blue-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  40. rpm -Uvh ogo-theme-kde-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  41. rpm -Uvh ogo-theme-ooo-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  42. rpm -Uvh ogo-theme-orange-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  43. rpm -Uvh ogo-tools-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  44. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-calendar-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  45. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-contact-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  46. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-core-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  47. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-mailer-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  48. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-mailer-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  49. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-news-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  50. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-project-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  51. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-basque-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  52. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-dk-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  53. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-es-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  54. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-fr-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  55. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-hu-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  56. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-it-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  57. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-jp-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  58. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-nl-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  59. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-no-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  60. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-pl-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  61. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-pt-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  62. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-ptbr-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  63. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-resource-sk-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  64. rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-task-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  65. rpm -Uvh ogo-xmlrpcd-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  66. rpm -Uvh ogo-zidestore-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  67. rpm -Uvh ogo-zidestore-devel-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  68. rpm -Uvh ogo-meta-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm
  69. ###### /SNIP #######

Some things to note about the install.

These all have to be done on one line or “rpm” will complain that it can’s resolve dependancies:
rpm -Uvh ogo-webui-app-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm ogo-theme-default-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm ogo-webui-resource-en-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm ogo-webui-resource-de-1.1.5-r1717.0.i386.rpm

ogo-database-setup-1.1.5-0.i386.rpm sets up your PostgreSQL database and database user for you. The output should look something like this:


Preparing...                     ########################################### [100%]
1:ogo-database-setup             ########################################### [100%]
PostgreSQL seems to be already initialized
and I can see it running:
PIDS used: 3456 3458 3459
We're on PostgreSQL 7 (7.4)
checking /var/lib/pgsql/data/postgresql.conf
need to patch /var/lib/pgsql/data/postgresql.conf for 7.4
backup current one to /var/lib/pgsql/data/postgresql.conf.20061213-153319
checking /var/lib/pgsql/data/pg_hba.conf
need to patch /var/lib/pgsql/data/pg_hba.conf for 7.4
backup current one to /var/lib/pgsql/data/pg_hba.conf.20061213-153319
The changes we've made require that we restart PostgreSQL...
Stopping postgresql service:    [  OK  ]
Starting postgresql service:      [  OK  ]
OK! PostgreSQL runs again: (3909 3911 3912)
creating database user: OGo
creating the database itself: OGo
we've successfully created both the user OGo and the raw database OGo
we'll now fill the database with the scheme itself
checking the logfile created during scheme rollin... 
/tmp/database_setup_psql.sh.20061213-153319.log
removing log - not needed anymore

OK… Now everything is installed, and if you run the following command:

# /sbin/chkconfig –list | grep ogo

You should see the following output:

ogo-zidestore   0:off   1:off   2:on    3:on    4:on    5:on    6:off
ogo-webui       0:off   1:off   2:on    3:on    4:on    5:on    6:off
ogo-xmlrpcd     0:off   1:off   2:on    3:on    4:on    5:on    6:off
ogo-nhsd        0:off   1:off   2:on    3:on    4:on    5:on    6:off

Now, let’s fire up these services:


# /sbin/service ogo-zidestore start
# /sbin/service ogo-webui start
# /sbin/service ogo-xmlrpcd start
# /sbin/service ogo-nhsd start

Everything should be up and running now, so you can grab a web browser and go to the following RUL:

http://server.domain.com/OpenGroupware

You will be logged in as the root user, so make sure to change the password.

If you are using this system as a stand-alone server, you are pretty much all set. We needed to authenticate it against our central LDAP, and point it towards our IMAP server though, so I added the following lines to “/var/lib/opengroupware.org/.libFoundation/DefaultsNSGlobalDomain.plist”:


LSAuthLDAPServer = "ldapserver.domain.com";
LSAuthLDAPServerRoot = "dc=mydomain,dc=com";
imap_host = "imapserver.domain.com";
UseSkyrixLoginForImap = YES;

Make sure to put these lines at the end of the file, but before the closing braces.

The file should look something like this:

###### SNIP #######
{
"skyrix_id" = "server.domain.com";
LSConnectionDictionary = {
  databaseName = OGo;
  hostName = "127.0.0.1";
  password = "";
  port = 5432;
  userName = OGo;
};
  LSNewsImagesPath = "/var/lib/opengroupware.org/news";
  LSNewsImagesUrl = "/ArticleImages";
  Languages = (
  English
);
  TimeZoneName = GMT;
  WOHttpAllowHost = (
  localhost,
  "127.0.0.1",
  "localhost.localdomain"
);
  LSAuthLDAPServer = "ldapserver.domain.com";
  LSAuthLDAPServerRoot = "dc=domain,dc=com";
  imap_host = "imapserver.domain.com";
  UseSkyrixLoginForImap = YES;
}
###### /SNIP #######

Since the system won’t let you authenticate the “root” user against the local database if your are using LDAP, you have to create a root user on your central LDAP.

Create an LDIF file called root.ldif like so:

###### SNIP #######
dn: uid=root,ou=People,dc=mydomain,dc=com
objectClass: organizationalPerson
objectClass: top
objectClass: posixAccount
objectClass: shadowAccount
uid: root
uidNumber: 0
gidNumber: 0
sn: Root
cn: Root
homeDirectory: /root
loginShell: /bin/bash
gecos: Root
###### /SNIP #######

Finally, run the following command to add the root user:


ldapadd -x -D "cn=Manager,dc=mydomain,dc=com" -W -f root.ldif"

You should now be authenticating against your central LDAP server. Have fun!

Working With Disk Labels in RHEL

When you install RHEL, the filesystems are labeled for you. Usually you won’t have to mess with it anymore, but on occasion, you may want to change them to more accurately represent the data that is stored on that partition. If, for instance, you used to have all of your database files on a partition labeled “/database”, but you have now moved them somewhere else, and you now wish to house your user account data there, it would make sense to change the label to something like “/users”.

Labels are, of course, arbitrary, so there is no technical need to do this, and you could, instead simply change the mount point in the fstab file, mounting the partition by device name rather than label, but it is usually cleaner to change the label. Here is how you do it:

First, let’s figure out what the partition is currently labeled as:

[root@calvin /]# /sbin/e2label /dev/hda4
/database
[root@calvin /]#

It’s current label is “/database”, and, since we have moved the database data somewhere else, we now want to store our user account data here, we need to change it to “/users”.

[root@calvin /]# /sbin/e2label /dev/hda4 /users
[root@calvin /]#

That’s all there is to it, now we check to make sure we have done what we think we have done.

[root@calvin /]# /sbin/e2label /dev/hda4
/users
[root@calvin /]#

Sure enough, it’s now labeled “/users” and the data on the disk remains intact. Now all we have to do is change the appropriate entry in the “/etc/fstab” file to represent the change.

Change this:

LABEL=/database       /databases            ext3    defaults        1 2


To this:

LABEL=/users          /users                ext3    defaults        1 2


And you’re all set to go. Make sure you have unmounted “/databases” before making the change.

Now, just run:
[root@calvin /]# mount /users
[root@calvin /]#

And you’re all set to go. As always, change the values here to represent those in your environment.

Controlling Services With chkconfig

Many system 5 UNIX variants use scripts in the /etc/rcN.d/ directories to control which services should be started in the various runlevels. If, for instance, you wanted the secure shell daemon to run in runlevel 4, you would put a script named something like “S55sshd” in “/etc/rc4.d”. This script would usually accept the “start” “stop” and “restart” arguments, as well as the commands to perform these functions. When the system came up, it would execute “/etc/rc4.d/S55sshd start” when it transitioned into runlevel 4. On the way down, it would execute “/etc/rc4.d/S55sshd stop” as the system passed from runlevel 4 to runlevel 3. If you had made some changes to the sshd configuration file, and wanted to restart the service, you could manually execute “/etc/rc3.d/sshd restart” to kill and then restart the daemon.

Since this model involved having multiple copies of the same script in many different directories, Linux and others have adopted the standard of putting all service control scripts in “/etc/init.d/”, and using symbolic links to these scripts in the various “/etc/rcN.d/” directories. This allowed for the SGI IRIX innovation of the “chkconfig” command, which is command line tool that manages the symbolic links for you.

How to use “chkconfig” in Red Hat Enterprise Linux:

First, all your service control scripts need to be in the “/etc/init.d/” directory. They should reflect the name of the service they control. In our example, the file is named /etc/init.d/sshd”.

Secondly, they have a tag at the head of the script that looks something like this so that “chkconfig” understands that it can controll it:

# Basic support for IRIX style chkconfig
###
# chkconfig: 2345 55 25
# description: Manages the services you are controlling with the chkconfig command
###

The first set of numbers “2345” is are the default runlevels for the service, and “55” and “25” represent the name of the “S” and “K” symbolic links, and the order in which the service will be started and stopped in the respective runlevel. You will need to change these last two numbers, making them unique.

Once these requirements are met, using the command is fairly simple. When we go into /etc/rc3.d, we see a file called “S55sshd”.

[root@calvin rc2.d]# cd /etc/rc3.d
[root@calvin rc2.d]# ls -al S55sshd
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 14 Nov 15 15:10 S55sshd -> ../init.d/sshd

We see this file is a symbolic link to “../init.d/sshd”. Let’s run the “chkconfig” command to turn sshd off.

[root@calvin init.d]# /sbin/chkconfig sshd off
[root@calvin init.d]# /sbin/chkconfig --list sshd
sshd 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:off 4:off 5:off 6:off

chkconfig --list sshd confirms that sshd has been disabled in all runlevels, and the symbolic link has been removed from all “/etc/rcN.d/” directories.

Let’s turn sshd back on:

[root@calvin init.d]# /sbin/chkconfig sshd on
[root@calvin rc2.d]# /sbin/chkconfig --list sshd
sshd 0:off 1:off 2:on 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off

chkconfig --list sshd confirms that sshd has now been enabled in runlevels 2, 3, 4 and 5, and we see s symbolic link to “/etc/init.d/sshd” named “S55sshd” in “/etc/rc2.d/”, “/etc/rc3.d/”, “/etc/rc4.d/” and “/etc/rc5.d/”.

Let’s imagine now that we only want sshd to be enabled in runlevel 5. We run the following command to accomplish this:

[root@calvin rc2.d]# /sbin/chkconfig sshd --level 234 off
cd /etc/[root@calvin rc2.d]# /sbin/chkconfig --list sshd
sshd 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:off 4:off 5:on 6:off

chkconfig --list sshd confirms that sshd has been disabled in all runlevels except 5, and the “S55sshd” has been removed from “/etc/rc2.d/”, “/etc/rc3.d/” and “/etc/rc4.d/”.

There is, of course, more to it, but this should get you well on your way to happily managing your system services with “chkconfig”.

Solaris Automounter

Whenever you’re using NFS mount points, it’s really nice to use some type of automounter. Linux and FreeBSD use AMD to accomplish this, but Solaris uses automountd, and it’s fun and easy to use… Here is an example of a configuration that will automatically mount an NFS share and unmount it after 5 minuets of inactivity.

We have a system called micky which has an NFS point shared to a system called minny as /shareme.
We can see that it is set up in the /etc/dfs/dfstab file on micky:

share -F nfs -o ro=minny.yourdomain.com -d “NFS ShareMe” /shareme

The above will share the directory read-only. If you would like to map the directory as root and be able to write to it, the command would look more like this:

share -F nfs -o rw,root=minny.yourdomain.com -d “NFS ShareMe” /shareme

You can run the share command on micky to check to make sure it is shared:

# share
– /shareme ro=minny.yourdomain.com “NFS ShareMe”

If it’s not shared, run shareall to share it:

# shareall

Now, jump on over to minny and add the following line to /etc/auto_master:

/- auto_direct

Automountd will now look in /etc/auto_direct for direct mount points.

Next edit /etc/auto_direct and add the following line:

/micky-shareme micky:/shareme

Now, create the directory for the NFS mount point on minny:

# mkdir /micky-shareme

Finally, run the auromount command on minny to inform the daemon of the changes:

# automount

That should do it… Have fun with your new automount NFS share.

More information on this can be found here

Solaris Virtual Network Interfaces

Sometimes it’s useful to create a virtual network interface on your Solaris box, so that you can associate multiple IP addresses with the same host and not have to go through all the trouble of buying another NIC.

Here’s a quick HOWTO. Let’s assume our network card is eri0, and we want to create a virtual interface called eri0:1

Create the virtual interface:
# ifconfig eri0:1 plumb

Configure the virtual interface:
# ifconfig eri0:1 179.164.83.161 netmask 255.255.255.0 broadcast 179.164.83.255

Check to make sure it worked:

# ifconfig -a

lo0: flags=1000849 mtu 8232 index 1
inet 127.0.0.1 netmask ff000000
eri0: flags=1000843
mtu 1500 index 2
inet 179.164.83.160 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 179.164.83.255
ether 0:3:ba:9:63:9b
eri0:1: flags=1000842 mtu 1500 index 2
inet 179.164.83.161 netmask ffffff00 broadcast 179.164.83.255

Finally bring up your new virtual interface:
# ifconfig eri0:1 up

To make it come up on start:

create /etc/hostname.eri0:1 with hostname in it
make sure the hostname is in /etc/hosts

NOTE: The IP addresses in this story have been changed to protect the innocent.